new filament materials

Hello,

I am very excited about the new materials in the store, but at the same time  I am also somewhat confused now which material would be appropriate for me...

Doing architectural stuff I normally resort to z-ultrat, mainly because it is less prone to warping. Now I read that hips and also glass are also not warping very much. On the other side the new materials do not support 0.09 mm layer height, so I would loose a little bit of detail...

I would love to see the available materials to be put in an order, beginning with the best in the given category like this:

Shrinkage / dimensional stability:

BEST

1. z-ultrat?

2. z-hips?

3. z-glass?

4. z-abs?

WORST 

mechanical resistance  / toughness

BEST

1. z-ultrat?

2. z-hips?

3. z-abs?

4. z-glass?

WORST

Resolution / detail

BEST

1. z-ultrat?

2. z-hips?

3. z-abs?

4. z-glass?

WORST

...add more categories if you like like translucency, flexibility, machinability...

Is it still best for me to use z-ultrat for architectural models ?

thank you for your answers.

best

Andreas

Here you can find the all Z-Filament materials properties: http://support.zortrax.com/hc/en-us/articles/201931381-Z-Filament-Series

I can't give you one answer which material is the best for any category because it is depend which properties should have project. For e.x one of the mechanical part should have a high resistance to abrasion and to be hard but the another mechanical part should have a high impact resistance and flexible. 

Thank you Rafal, I saw the properties, but I have difficulties to decide when should I prefer material  A over material B

Why not start with shrinking?

which material shrinks the most? Which is the least prone to shrinkage?

best

Andreas

Here you can find the all Z-Filament materials properties: http://support.zortrax.com/hc/en-us/articles/201931381-Z-Filament-Series

I can't give you one answer which material is the best for any category because it is depend which properties should have project. For e.x one of the mechanical part should have a high resistance to abrasion and to be hard but the another mechanical part should have a high impact resistance and flexible. 

Warping = shrinking, if some material have a high rate of warping, have also high rate of shrinking. These two properties are dependent on each other.

Extensibility = Elasticity? Or just elonging capacity?

Maybe a bit of a language barrier. Better terms might be elastic deformation & tensile strength. Not sure, though.

Warping = shrinking, if some material have a high rate of warping, have also high rate of shrinking. These two properties are dependent on each other.

OK - I know but what is the material that has the least shrinking issues...

Z-HIPS and Z-GLASS

Thanks!

is hips comparable to ultrat for printing details on architectural models (railings, window frames, tubes…?

I think this really boils down to "show me, don't tell me".

I agree with the above users that the text is confusing.

I find the text pretty much pointless.

I'll go ahead and break it down:

T-Glass:

With Z-GLASS engineers can monitor light transmission

What do you mean by "monitor"?

Unless the material is truly transparent (as in: no level of opacity), I don't see how monitoring light transmission through it would be helpful. Also: For thicker parts: If you can't print with 100% in-fill (a truly SOLID object), then that's another reason not to trust any light monitoring through the not-solid material. Also: The picture sure doesn't make this material look very translucent. Looks to be minimally (if at all) translucent on the roll.

which is important for automotive parts.

examples?

I'm having a hard time seeing how a translucent material is important enough for automotive parts to justify this sentence... maybe if you spent your days designing tail-lights or something but for the most part I'm gonna go out on a limb and say ABS is more important for automotive parts.

It is one of our most resistant to warping material.

Great!... but it seems all of the new materials claim the same thing.

There is no telling what material is "most resistant to warping" when reading the text descriptions of the different materials.

Z-GLASS is also useful for designers for its glossy, elegant finish.

Ok, but how glossy and what do you mean by "elegant".

Z-Ultrat is also glossy, how does this compare?

Z-GLASS is a filament with a high elasticity and extensibility level and a slight warping issue, dedicated to work with Zortrax M200.

I'm so confused. Are you trying to tell me this material is or is not prone to warping, because I could have sworn a couple sentences back it was "one of our most resistant to warping"?

Perfect for lifelike functional prototypes.

Still confused. Is this more perfect for lifelike functional prototypes than any of the other materials? If not I don't think this sentence is adding anything.

T-Glass:

Z-HIPS is a durable thermoplastic filament engineered for Zortrax M200.

Is it more durable than the other plastics? How does it compare to Ultrat... whatever secret material that is.

Z-HIPS is one of our most resistant to warping material.

Along with all the other materials that aren't ABS.

Parts 3D printed with this filament are mechanically strong and perform much like the final product.

What is the "final product" that we are comparing to here? A HIPS injection-molded part? If so then how much "like" the final product does it actually compare?

With Z-HIPS and Z-Suite software engineers can 3D print precise, functional prototypes as manufacturing tooling.

Are you trying to say we can 3D print at the same precision as injection-molding? If so, then are you saying this material is more accurate than any of the other material? If not, then you are choosing to point out an attribute for this material and not pointing out the same attribute for the other materials. It's quite confusing.

Z-HIPS is a material with low elasticity, high impact strength and very low level of deformation.

But what does this all mean? How does it compare to the other materials? And yes, apparently all of the new materials share a "low level of deformation"... except maybe Z-Glass... I'm still scratching my head on that one.

Excellent for large, advanced prints.

Why? And what do you mean by "advanced"? How does it compare w/ Ultrat (again... whatever secret material that is)? Can I not print advanced parts in ABS? 

From a consumers perspective, the accompanying text just seems like pointless "filler".

To me it feels like you trying to up-sell something I may not even need.

Please revisit the text for all of your materials and make it more consistent, concise, and logical.

I'd really like to be printing with more materials, and it's your job (as the seller) to convince me I'm making the right purchasing decisions.

remember:

Show me, don't tell me.

show me why I would want the new materials.

Hope that helps.

Thank you Joshpit2003!

although I wouldn’t have put it in so harsh words, that are exactly my thoughts…

Still happy we have more to choose from thought. …

Guys, you're mostly right, I was thinking about the same things. Maybe MDS&MSDS files for the new filaments will fix this issue more than any marketing stuff.

I think some kind of matrix with the materials on the X and the properties on the Y axis would be great.

Then just fill it out with --,-, o, +, ++, yes, no, or something like that to describe the properties of each material relative to the others. This way you have a great overview. Properties could be warping, elasticity, impact resistance, translucency, engineering, artwork, glossy?, temperature resistance, etc…

I think the language barrier plays a big part here, too…I know this well as a German living in the US :wink: …example would be the “slight warping issue” of z-glass. I’m pretty sure it is supposed to mean “with minimal warping issues”. You see this tendency throughout the whole website. I would recommend to have some natural English speaker proof-read everything. I would love to offer my services but I’m not a natural either… :D…maybe when the German website comes around…

I nominate Josh... He seems to nitpick everything to death..  :D 

I'm not an engineer by profession so I don't care about light monitoring.. I'm guessing Josh is.. I do however know that if I want to print a housing for a light, I can.. That would be great for any lighting application. Home or auto.. I'm guessing the light in the "Show me" doesn't look elegant to Josh either.. I would use the word cool but I'm not going to beat this to death.. After all.. It's just a choice of a single word.. The stool looks great.. Not so elegant as it does not have the right curves for me.. It does however look very sturdy and functional.. (end user product)  What good is a stool prototype if you can't sit on it.. I'm probably making no sense again.. Looking forward to trying out some new stuff!!

I don't know what is not understood in the table:

material_props_tabelka.jpg

Here is the more technical description for Z-HIPS and Z-GLASS

Where did you get this ?!

That is basically what I was hoping for - thanks!

http://support.zortrax.com/hc/en-us -> Materials  :ph34r:

I got it from @Rafal link:

Here you can find the all Z-Filament materials properties: http://support.zortrax.com/hc/en-us/articles/201931381-Z-Filament-Series

I don't know what is not understood in the table:

material_props_tabelka.jpg

Here is the more technical description for Z-HIPS and Z-GLASS

Perfect! Very easy to understand... if you know that it even exists. :D

Why not having a link on the shop page?